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We are Family for Every Child, a global alliance of local civil society organisations working together to improve the lives of children around the world. This is a site for you, the members of Family for Every Child.

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Impressive progress has been made towards efforts to provide universal primary education (UNESCO and UNICEF 2015). However, evidence suggests that not all children have benefited from increased access to schooling, with the most disadvantaged children commonly missing out (UNICEF 2015; UNESCO 2015b). This report considers one such group: children without adequate care.

Children without adequate care are girls and boys who do not receive the necessary physical and psychological support from parents or carers in a nurturing family environment. They include children in institutional care, children outside of family care living on the streets or with employers, and those who are abused and neglected within their own families.1 There is evidence to suggest that the numbers of children without adequate care is increasing and the relationship between inadequate care and education is therefore of major significance (Family for Every Child 2014).

This report argues that children’s rights to education and care are inextricably linked, with a loss of adequate care commonly pushing children out of school, and education systems having the potential to help prevent unnecessary family separation, abuse and neglect. It is further argued that education systems need to adapt to better support children in different forms of alternative care. Currently, the linkages between children’s education and their care are not widely recognised.

This report was written by Camilla Jones of Family for Every Child, with inputs from David Schley of Challenging Heights, Joanna Rogers of Partnership for Every Child and Chaste Uwihoreye of Uyisenga Ni Imanzi, plus Emily Delap, Amanda Griffith and Hugh Salmon of the secretariat of Family for Every Child.

Download the report